Just my fandom blog... This is the personal one: http://mycloudycastle.tumblr.com/

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from BLOODY BRILLIANT BOOKS with 1,157 notes

Elements: Books Coffee Beer

(or as I would call it: Paradise exists!).

265 Main Street. Biddeford, Maine 04005. Facebook

Source: bookporn

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Yosgcast with 633 notes

avitus-melodiam:

The Cutest Box of Awesomeness! (Unboxing Vlog)

Source: avitus-melodiam

23rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from did you know? with 3,089 notes

did-you-kno:

Artist Hoang Tran draws inspiration from pop culture when making intricate crayon carvings of famous characters. Each hand-carved sculpture takes several hours to complete.     Source

did-you-kno:

Artist Hoang Tran draws inspiration from pop culture when making intricate crayon carvings of famous characters. Each hand-carved sculpture takes several hours to complete. Source

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Go Book Yourself with 516 notes

gobookyourself:

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

For more unhinged narrators with disturbing stories to tell, try these…

Tampa by Alissa Nutting for the bold, unflinching portrait of a young female teacher bent on seducing a 14-year old boy.

The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei for a dark satire that does for the modern marketing agency what American Psycho did for ’80s Wall Street.

The Death of Bunny Monro by Nick Cave for the twisted, hilarious, sex-fueled adventures of a door-to-door salesman in the South of England.

The Room by Hubert Selby Jr. for a journey into the mind of a killer, and the sick fantasies of heroism and murder he imagines.

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23rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from The Review Marina with 11,704 notes

prettybooks:

It’s Banned Books Week!I think I speak for all of us when I say that challenging or banning books just makes us want to read them more. Here’s what I’ve been reading this week so far on the subject of books and censorship:

Banned Books Week.orgThe Top 10 Challenged TitlesBooks Challenged or Banned 2012-2013 11 Quotes From Authors On Censorship & Banned Books15 Books Banned For The Most Absurd Reasons Ever12 Crazy Reasons Why Books Have Been Banned12 Signs You’re A Banned Book ReaderOn the “Banned” Wagon: The Month in Book ChallengesAmerica’s Most Surprising Banned Books A Chat With Rainbow Rowell About Love and CensorshipPenguin Presents: Authors Stand Up for Free SpeechPatrick Ness’s Top 10 ‘Unsuitable’ Books for TeenagersGiving Voice to the Voiceless: Author Ellen Hopkins

prettybooks:

It’s Banned Books Week!
I think I speak for all of us when I say that challenging or banning books just makes us want to read them more. Here’s what I’ve been reading this week so far on the subject of books and censorship:

Source: prettybooks

23rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from The Book Hangover with 89,075 notes

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Source: creatingaquietmind

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Remember the Monsters with 1,673 notes

Source: vierawood

23rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Neil Gaiman with 3,107 notes

neil-gaiman:

http://www.heforshe.org/
Supporting it as a feminist and as a human being…

(Photo by Amanda Palmer)

neil-gaiman:

http://www.heforshe.org/

Supporting it as a feminist and as a human being…

(Photo by Amanda Palmer)

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from SHINee Be My Bitches(Babies:3) with 3,855 notes

“Rather than dwelling upon things I can’t change, I’d rather develop the good things about me. So my dream is not to become the best, it’s to be someone who I’m not ashamed to be.” -Kim Kibum (Key)

Source: shaenishinee

23rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from what with 39,552 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

The Many Adventures of Biddy the Hedgehog

Related: The Many Expressions of Marutaro the Hedgehog

Source: tastefullyoffensive